Work Requirements from Medicaid May Harm Some Seniors

States that have opted to require Medicaid recipients to work, will put some seniors at risk of losing healthcare coverage.

States that have opted to require Medicaid recipients to work, will put some seniors at risk of losing healthcare coverage.

Bigstock-Senior-couple-standing-togethe-12052331A recent article from US News & World Report, “How Medicaid Work Requirements Could Hurt Older Americans,”explains how the new requirements for Medicaid recipients to work or meet “community engagement” requirements may create hardships for some seniors. Many lower income Americans depend on Medicaid for healthcare, including adults age 50 to 64, who often suffer from chronic health conditions.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced in January that states can apply for waivers to implement work requirements for people who receive Medicaid benefits. The waivers have been approved in three states and are pending approval in others. Age limits vary for who might have to fulfill work or "community engagement" requirements for up to 80 hours a month. In Kentucky, Medicaid recipients are exempt at 64. In Indiana, it’s 60, and in Arkansas, 50 is the threshold. Some other states are looking to implement work requirements. They include Arizona, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Utah and Wisconsin.

Beth Kuhn, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Workforce Investment, notes that most people on Medicaid also receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits—also known as food stamps. For those 80% of Medicaid recipients, she says, work requirements don't apply after age 49.

Community engagement is the prime focus of the new requirements, which entails four facets: volunteering, training and education, work, and caregiving of a family or community member in need.

There are many who are excluded from the requirement, and one group is the medically frail. Medical frailty would be determined by an eligibility specialist.  However, it’s not clear now how chronic medical conditions impacting many beneficiaries, like asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, and hypertension, will be considered.

A group of Kentucky residents receiving Medicaid, are now being represented in a federal class action lawsuit by The Southern Poverty Law Center, National Health Law Program, and Kentucky Equal Justice Center. A joint brief was filed by the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA), AARP, AARP Foundation, Justice in Aging and the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund.

According to a spokesperson with Justice in Aging, the brief focuses on the elimination of pre-application coverage, elimination of non-emergency medical transportation and the imposition of lockout penalties for various transgressions. With no pre-application coverage, an individual could easily become liable for thousands of dollars of health care costs, if an illness or injury prevented them from filing a Medicaid application.

Reference: US News & World Report (April 20, 2018) “How Medicaid Work Requirements Could Hurt Older Americans”

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