What Is Involved with Serving as an Executor?

Serving as an executor of a relative’s estate may seem like an honor, but it can also be a lot of work, says The (Fostoria, OH) Review Times’ recent article entitled “An executor’s guide to settling a loved one’s estate.”  

Serving as an executor
Serving as an executor of an estate is an honor, but it could also comes with some challenges.

When serving as an executor of a will, you’re tasked with settling the decedent’s affairs after she dies. This may sound rather easy, but you should be aware that the job could be time consuming and difficult, depending on the size of the decedent’s estate and the complexity of the decedent’s financial and family situation. Here are some of the duties that are expected of anyone serving as an executor:

  • Filing court papers to initiate the probate process
  • Taking inventory of the decedent’s estate
  • Using the decedent’s estate funds to pay bills, taxes, and funeral costs
  • Taking care of canceling her credit cards and informing banks and government offices like Social Security and the post office of her death
  • Readying and filing her final income tax returns; and
  • Distributing assets to the beneficiaries named in the decedent’s will.

Each state has specific laws and deadlines for the responsibilities of anyone serving as an executor. To help you, work with an experienced estate planning attorney and take note of these reminders:

Get organized. Make sure that the decedent has an updated will and locate all her important documents and financial information. Having easy access to deeds, brokerage statements and insurance policies will save you a lot of time and effort, making the job of serving as an executor much easier. With a complex estate, you may want to hire an experienced estate planning attorney to help you through the process. The estate will pay that expense.

Avoid conflicts. Investigate to see if there are any conflicts between the beneficiaries of the decedent’s estate. If there are some potential issues, you can make your job as executor much easier if everyone knows in advance who’s getting what, and the decedent’s rationale for making those decisions. Ask the person you’ll be serving as an executor for to tell her beneficiaries what they can expect, even with her personal items because last wills often leave it up to the executor to distribute heirlooms.

Executor fees. You’re entitled to a fee for the work you do serving as an executor. The fee is paid by the estate. In most states, executors are allowed to take a percentage of the estate’s value, which can be from 1-5%, depending on the size of the estate. However, if you’re also a beneficiary, it may make sense for you to forgo the fee because fees are taxable as income, and it could also cause rancor among the other beneficiaries.

Reference: The (Fostoria, OH) Review Times (Aug. 19, 2020) “An executor’s guide to settling a loved one’s estate”

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