Will Contest

Dividing Pablo Picasso’s Estate, a Disaster

When he died, Pablo Picasso’s estate contained 1,885 paintings, 1,228 sculptures, 7,089 drawings, as well as tens of thousands of prints, thousands of ceramic works and 150 sketchbooks when he passed away in 1973. He owned five homes and a large portfolio of stocks and bonds. “The Master” fathered four children with three women. He was also thought to have had $4.5 million in cash and $1.3 million in gold in his possession when he died. Once again, Picasso did not leave a will. Distributing his assets took six years of contentious negotiations between his children and other heirs, such as his wives, mistresses, legitimate children and his illegitimate ones.

Pablo Picasso's Estate
Picasso left behind 1,885 paintings, 1,228 sculptures, 7,089 drawings.

Celebrity Net Worth’s recent article entitled “When Pablo Picasso Died He Left Behind Billions Of Dollars Worth Of Art … Yet He Left No Will” explains that Picasso was creating art up until his death. Unlike most artists who die broke, he had been famous in his lifetime. However, when he died without a will, people came out of the woodwork to claim a piece of his valuable estate. Only one of Picasso’s four children was born to a woman who was his wife. One of his mistresses had been living with him for decades. She had a direct and well-documented influence on his work. However, Picasso had no children with her. Dividing his estate was a disaster.

A court-appointed auditor who evaluated Picasso’s assets after his death said that he was worth between $100-$250 million (about $530 million to $1.3 billion today, after adjusting for inflation). In addition to his art, his heirs were fighting over the rights to license his image rights. The six-year court battle cost $30 million in legal fees to settle. But it didn’t settle for long, as the heirs began fighting over the rights to Picasso’s name and image. In 1989, his son Claude sold the name and the image of Picasso’s signature to French carmaker Peugeot-Citroen for $20 million. They wanted to release a sedan called the “Citroen Xsara Picasso.” However, one of Picasso’s grandchildren tried to halt the sale because she disagreed with the commission paid to the agent who brokered the deal—but oddly enough, the consulting company was owned by her cousin, another Picasso.

Claude created the Picasso Administration in Paris in the mid-90s. This entity manages the heirs’ jointly owned property, controls the rights to exhibitions and reproductions of the master’s works, and authorizes merchandising licenses for his work, name and image. The administration also investigates forgeries, illegal use of the Picasso name and stolen works of art. In the 47 years since his death, Picasso has been the most reproduced, most exhibited, most stolen and most faked artist of all time.

Pablo Picasso’s heirs are all very well off as a result of his art. His youngest daughter, Paloma Picasso, is the richest, with $600 million. She’s had a successful career as a jewelry designer.  She also enjoys her share of her father’s estate.

Reference: Celebrity Net Worth (Sep, 13, 2020) “When Pablo Picasso Died He Left Behind Billions Of Dollars Worth Of Art … Yet He Left No Will”

How Do I Disinherit a Family Member?

Kiplinger’s recent article, “Four Ways to Disinherit Family Members,” says that quite a few families don’t get along. However, when considering estate planning, the problem is that without a valid will leaving money to other individuals, family members are the “default” recipient of your estate. If you decide to leave any property using your will, your next-of-kin must still be given legal notice of your estate being probated (even if they’re being disinherited), and usually they’re only ones who can legitimately contest your will.

If you do have bad family relations and don’t want family members contesting your will, there are several legal tactics you can use.

  1. Leave property outside of your will. You’ll only need to probate property that’s not already effectively left to someone outside of probate. Therefore, when you name a beneficiary or co-owner on your accounts or real estate, that property won’t go through probate. Similarly, life insurance policies and retirement plans ask you to name a beneficiary, and investment and bank accounts usually let you name a “transfer on death” beneficiary. Finally, any property passing by living trusts also avoids probate.
  2. Add a ‘no-contest’ clause to your will. If you decide to disinherit your family or leave them less than they would be entitled to if you had no will, you can use a “no-contest” (aka “in terrorem”) clause. A no-contest clause states that if someone contests your will, they get nothing. However, people mess up by adding a no-contest clause, then they leave no property to the disinherited family member. Because the disowned family member is getting nothing anyway, he has nothing to lose by contesting the document. Thus, the clause serves no purpose. For a no-contest clause to be effective, leave a more-than-nominal bequest and let the potential contestant know that there’s a decent alternative to receiving nothing. Leaving them an amount acts as an incentive to not contest the will.
  3. Documenting the reasons for disinheriting. Use descriptive letters to supplement (and not supplant) your proper legal documents, and create formal, signed memorandums with notarized signatures to support but not replace those documents.
  4. Create other legal documents to disinherit your spouse. Pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements can address what happens, if you get divorced and when you die. You and your spouse may also “waive” estate rights in a separate document that doesn’t even deal with a potential divorce. The only downside with these agreements, is that they require both parties to agree. They also usually require separate legal counsel to make them most effective.

Work with a qualified estate panning attorney when you want to leave someone out of your will.

Reference: Kiplinger (November 13, 2019) “Four Ways to Disinherit Family Members”

Why is the Cars’ Ric Ocasek’s Wife Contesting His Will?

“I have made no provision for my wife Paulina Porizkova (‘Paulina’), as we are in the process of divorcing,” the late Cars’ singer Ric Ocasek wrote in his will.

Wealth Advisor’s recent article, “Cars singer Ric Ocasek cuts supermodel wife Paulina Porizkova out of will,” reports that the will went on to state: “Even if I should die before our divorce is final … Paulina is not entitled to any elective share … because she has abandoned me.”

Porizkova was the one who discovered her estranged husband’s body in September, as she brought him a cup of coffee. Ocasek was recovering in his New York City townhouse from a recent surgery.

The couple had two sons together but ended their marriage in May 2018, after 28 years. They first met while filming the music video for the Cars’ song “Drive” in 1984.

Porizkova said that Ocasek’s death was “untimely and unexpected.”

“I found him still asleep when bringing him his Sunday morning coffee,” she wrote in a statement published to Instagram following Ocasek’s death.

“I touched his cheek to rouse him. It was then I realized that during the night he had peacefully passed on.”

Reports say that Ocasek’s will lists his assets to include $5 million in “copyrights,” but only $100,000 in “tangible personal property” and $15,000 in cash.

The document doesn’t detail what constitutes the “copyrights” assets. Even though $5 million may appear low for a rock-legend like the Cars’ Ocasek, he likely had money stashed away in trusts. One reason why people use trusts, is to protect their privacy.

Ocasek’s will looks to have excluded two of his six sons, but not the children he had with Porizkova. Perhaps these two sons may have been compensated through other financial means.

The document indicates that Ocasek signed the will on August 28, just a month before his death. The 75-year-old died of heart disease on September 15.

Pulmonary emphysema, a type of lung disease, had also contributed to his death, the medical examiner said.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (November 12, 2019) “Cars singer Ric Ocasek cuts supermodel wife Paulina Porizkova out of will”

Why is Amy Winehouse’s Ex Filing a $1 Million Claim on the Late Singer’s Estate?

Thirty-seven-year-old Blake Fielder-Civil—the man who admitted that he started Amy on heroin—is asking for a lump sum payout plus a monthly allowance.

Fox News’ recent article, “Amy Winehouse’s ex files $1 million claim on late singer’s estate,” reports that one family member was quoted as saying, “To say that it would be inappropriate for him to benefit from her estate would be an understatement.”

Amy Winehouse died at aged 27 of alcohol poisoning in 2011. She didn’t leave a will, and her after-tax assets of $3.64 million went to her parents. Since her death, the value of her estate is thought to have grown considerably from song royalties.

Fielder-Civil has told Amy’s family his legal counsel believes that he has a valid claim, because he was with her for six years when she released some of her best-selling material. The two were married for two years and split in July 2009.

Amy gave Blake a $309,000 payoff, but attorneys say the details of that settlement will be critical in Fielder-Civil’s legal claim. If it was designated as a “clean-break,” then he has no real argument for demanding more money. However, if it didn’t, he may have a case.

Fielder-Civil, the inspiration for the late Grammy winner’s heartbreaking hit single “Back to Black,” was in prison from July 2008 to February 2009.

Amy’s parents created the Amy Winehouse Foundation to help young musicians and people with addiction problems. The family inked a deal to make a biopic about her life. The proceeds will go to the foundation.

Amy’s friends and family are upset that any successful claim by Fielder-Civil could take money from the charity.

Reference: Fox News (July 28, 2019) “Amy Winehouse’s ex files $1 million claim on late singer’s estate”

What’s Happening with Tom Petty’s Estate?

Tom Petty’s widow, Dana York Petty, planned to include unreleased tracks from her late husband’s celebrated 1994 solo album as part of a 25th anniversary edition box set.

However, Tom’s daughters Adria and Annakim, his children from a previous marriage, have blocked the release, according to iHeartRadio’s article, “Tom Petty’s Widow, Daughters Battling Over His Estate.”  

Dana says the daughters are interfering with her ability to manage Tom’s legacy. She’s reportedly requested that a judge name a day-to-day manager for the estate.

Adria argues that she and her sister were promised an equal share of control in their father’s estate, according to his will. She says her father’s “artistic property” was supposed to be placed into a separate company to be jointly administered by the three women. However, Dana disagrees.

Annakim seems to reference the battle in a recent Instagram post. She displayed a photo of her father with the caption, “We don’t sell out. No Vampires 2019.”

A subsequent reply in the comments section mentions Petty’s will.

Wildflowers was initially designed to be a double album, with Petty completing more than 25 songs in the initial sessions. However, he was convinced by his record label to take some some songs off for the final version.

Throughout the years, a few of the extra songs were released on various collections. However, Tom never relinquished his idea of releasing the set as a double LP.

Petty was reportedly planning a Wildflowers tour, before his death in October of 2017, to showcase all the leftover material.

Reference: iHeartRadio (April 3, 2019) “Tom Petty’s Widow, Daughters Battling Over His Estate”

Why Do I Need an Estate Plan?

Investopedia’s recent article, “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important,” says you should think about the following four reasons you should have an estate plan. According to the article, doing so can help avoid potentially devastating consequences for your family.

  1. An Estate Plan Keeps Your Assets from Going to Unintended Beneficiaries. A primary part of estate planning is choosing heirs for your assets. Without an estate plan, a judge will decide who gets your assets. This process can take years and can get heated. There’s no guarantee the judge will automatically rule that the surviving spouse gets everything.
  2. An Estate Plan Protects Your Young Children. If you are the parent of minor children, you need to name their guardians, in the event that both parents die before the children turn 18. Without including this in your will, the courts will make this decision.
  3. An Estate Plan Eliminates a Large Tax Burden for Your Heirs. Estate planning means protecting your loved ones—that also entails providing them with protection from the IRS. Your estate plan should transfer assets to your heirs and create the smallest tax burden as possible for them. Without a plan, the amount your heirs may owe the government could be substantial.
  4. An Estate Plan Reduces Family Headaches After You’ve Passed. There are plenty of horror stories about how the family starts fighting after the death of a loved one. You can avoid this. One way is to carefully choose who controls your finances and assets, if you become mentally incapacitated or after you die. This goes a long way towards eliminating family strife and making certain that your assets are handled in the way you want.

If you want to protect your assets and your loved ones after you’re gone, you need an estate plan. Without one, your heirs could face large tax burdens and the courts could decide how your assets are divided or even who will care for your children.

Reference: Investopedia (May 25, 2018) “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important”

I Was Left Out of a Will—What Can I Do?

It’s a stinging feeling. To be left out of a will feels like a rebuke from beyond the grave. You’ll need to set aside your emotions and consider your options, which may be limited.

Contested wills are not an easy battle. There are time limits to taking action. An estate planning attorney will be able to advise you on the requirements of your state. Investopedia’s article, “What To Do When You're Left Out Of A Will,” explains that you’ll need to be able to prove outright fraud, diminished mental capacity or coercion to have a will's terms dismissed.

GavelBefore making a federal case out of it, cool down for a few days and think things through. If you aren’t a family member and were never named in a previous will, you can’t contest the will. If the deceased talked to you about an inheritance before, write down as much as you can remember and estimate the dollar value (whether in money or possessions). If it was never discussed but was implied, you’ll need to give a high and a low estimate on what you could have reasonably received based on your knowledge of the estate. If this amount doesn’t cover your legal fees, forget it. You may even walk away, if it’s twice as much as the retainer because some estate battles cost more in legal fees than the inheritance. Again, consider this carefully.

The person who creates the will has the final word on who is and who is not in the will. If you have reason to believe that the will has changed, maybe because the person was under duress or suffering from diminished mental capacity, you can try to find out the details. You can ask the executor for the current will, any previous versions and a list of assets.

A sharp executor will compare copies of the will and note any significant changes. Therefore, it’s possible that a notice from the executor will be your first signal that you were removed from the will. If you aren’t told before the will goes to probate, you’ll be able to get a copy from the probate court. In addition, you’ll be told how long you have to contest the will. Each state has different rules and time limits, so ask a local estate planning attorney to help you get the copy and file the contest.

To contest the will, you need a valid reason. You need to reasonably prove that the testator lacked the mental capacity to understand what he was doing when the current will was signed, was pressured into changing it or that the will fails to meet state requirements and isn’t legal.

Your attorney will honestly tell you if you have a winnable case on these grounds. If you don't have grounds, there’s still a chance you can make a claim on the estate. For instance, if you did unpaid work for the testator, you may be able to claim costs. Again, look at the value of the claim versus the costs of moving forward.

With sufficient grounds, your attorney will file a contest against the will with the objective of invalidating the current will and enforcing a previous will that lists you as a beneficiary. If you’ve been left out of several revisions of the will, your chances of winning the dispute will be less because multiple wills must be invalidated. The burden of proof is on you, so be ready for a tough fight.

Instead of a court battle that will deplete your finances and those of the estate in legal costs, your attorney may be able to get the estate to agree to mediation. Mediation may be a better and faster resolution than a lengthy court battle.

Keep in mind that an estate contest comes with a great deal of emotional stress and could have a big impact on your relationship with family members or friends of the deceased. It is not easy to be left out of a will, but a realistic look at the financial and emotional cost of a battle that you may or may not win should be considered before throwing yourself into an estate contest.

Reference: Investopedia(May 31, 2018) “What To Do When You're Left Out Of A Will”

The Executor is Making a Mess of the Estate: What Now?

Estate litigation is never pleasant, but heirs have rights, and, in some situations, they have to fight back, when an executor is not acting in the best interest of the beneficiaries.

When siblings are able to work together to settle their parent’s estate, it may take a little time and there may be some negotiating.  However, the details are worked out. Sometimes the family bonds become even stronger. There are also ugly stories where families are fractured.

MP900400332This occurs when the executor acts with some (or a great deal of) self-interest, especially when it’s one of the siblings. That daughter may feel entitled to more than an equal share, because of the care she’s given the parent or because she resents her siblings’ successes, or any of a number of reasons.

What if the eldest sister gets her siblings to sign away their rights to everything? Perhaps some do, but when one sibling says no, this evil executor gets the will probated anyways. Subsequently, the lone hold-out finds out there was a testamentary trust created because she didn't sign away her rights, and—you guessed it—the eldest sister is the trustee. That’s dirty pool!

When the hold-out beneficiary requested an accounting of the trust, the evil executor/trustee refused. When an executor or trustee tries to keep the deceased parent’s estate and trust a secret, it’s not appropriate or acceptable, and she’s breaching her fiduciary duty.

nj.com’s recent article, “Your rights when family fights over a will,” explains that executors and trustees serve in a fiduciary capacity.  It means they have a legal obligation to act for another (the beneficiaries) in a fair, honest, and transparent manner. While executors and trustees have the legal authority to manage the affairs of an estate or trust, she’s accountable to the beneficiaries and must inform them of what she’s doing.

When a person dies, the executor must notify, in writing, all beneficiaries named in the will (and all heirs at law, like those entitled to inherit by intestacy) that a will has been probated. This must be done within a specific number of days of the will being probated. The executor must also provide a copy of the will upon request. After receiving the notice of probate, individuals may contest the will within a specific timeframe.

When the will is reviewed, beneficiaries can see that a testamentary trust was created. Once appointed, an executor must settle and distribute the estate as quickly and efficiently as possible. Both executors and trustees have a duty to collect and preserve assets, deal impartially with beneficiaries and act at all times with the best interests of the estate and trust in mindto be certain that the estate and trust are distributed, according to the decedent's wishes.

A fiduciary also has a duty to account to the beneficiaries.  Therefore, in the event a beneficiary has questions about how an estate or trust is being handled, he can request an accounting and copies of supporting documents. Likewise, a trustee is required to keep beneficiaries reasonably informed about the administration of the trust and information necessary for the beneficiaries to protect their interests. The trustee must promptly respond to the beneficiary's request for info on the administration of a trust. If a fiduciary willfully neglects or refuses to render an accounting or breaches her fiduciary duties, you can ask the court to remove her as the executor or trustee.

In this particular scenario, the older sister is legally bound to provide an accounting of the estate. If that shows that anything was done wrongfully, she may be personally liable for misconduct. She may even be liable to pay the legal fees incurred by other family members.

This can get messy, and it can be a tough time for everyone in the family. If it sounds all too familiar, you’ll want to speak with an attorney with experience in estate litigation.

Reference: nj.com (September 28, 2018) “Your rights when family fights over a will”

Estate Battle Shifts into High Gear Between Truck Dealership Owner’s Widow and Sons

The company posted $172 million in profit on $4.7 billion in revenue in 2017.

Marvin Rush II founded, what is now the biggest commercial truck dealership chain in North America. Lawsuits are now flying, between his third wife and his son, who claims that his father was incapacitated when new wills were created.

Marvin-rush-chairman-emeritus*750xx760-428-0-46The dispute over the estate of W. Marvin Rush II, between his wife Barbara Rush and his son, W.M. “Rusty” Rush lll, has led to both parties filing lawsuits.

The San Antonio Express-News reports in its article, “Dueling wills filed over late truck dealer Marvin Rush’s estate,” that chief among the assets at stake is most of Marvin’s stock in Rush Enterprises. That’s the business he founded, grew, and later took public. There are now more than 100 Rush Truck Centers in 22 states, and shares in the company are worth about $74 million. The company posted $172 million in profit on $4.7 billion in revenue in 2017. It employs nearly 7,000 workers.

Rusty claims those shares belong to him, based on his father’s 2006 will. Barbara says her husband of 26 years revoked that will, when he made a new one in May 2013 and then another in November 2013. The 2013 wills don’t have any specific bequest of Marvin’s shares, so Barbara says they’re part of his residuary estate. She’s the sole beneficiary.

Rusty alleges that his dad suffered from dementia, when he signed the 2013 wills. Barbara disagrees.

Marvin’s obituary said that in “his last few years” he battled Lewy Body Dementia, which can have a range of symptoms. They include problems with thinking, memory, moving and changes in behaviors.

Rusty filed his opposition to probating either of the 2013 wills. He said that the onset of his father’s dementia was at least five to eight years prior to his death, “thus placing Mr. Rush’s mental capacity in doubt from May 2010 onward.”

Marvin completely disinherited Rusty in the 2013 wills. They will stated, “I do not wish to make any provision hereunder for my son William Maurice Rush, III, or any of his descendants.”

Barbara was named the executor of Marvin’s estate in the 2006 will and in each of the 2013 wills.

The two 2013 wills, which cut Rusty out of any inheritance, “represented a dramatic departure from (Marvin’s) long-standing estate plan of leaving his shares of Stock in Rush Enterprises to his son Rusty,” Rusty’s filing states.

“These wills were also executed shortly after Mr. Rush, apparently with the encouragement of his wife, Barbara, had formed an irrational belief that his son Rusty was somehow ‘at fault’ when the Board of Directors insisted that Mr. Rush step down as Chairman of the Board in May of 2013,” Rusty’s filing continues.

Barbara challenges Rusty’s argument, saying that the 2013 wills were prepared by a law firm and signed by two witnesses.

Barbara’s argument is that if Marvin truly lacked capacity or was being subjected to undue influence by her, when the will was made in May 2013, then how was it possible that Rusty, who was the CEO and president of Rush Enterprises could have entered into a “Retirement and Transition Agreement” with his father at that time?

Expect this to be a long, drawn out estate battle.

Reference: San Antonio Express-News (August 24, 2018) “Dueling wills filed over late truck dealer Marvin Rush’s estate”

A Whole Lot of Soul, But No Estate Plan

The Queen of Soul’s four sons have filed a document that lists themselves as “interested parties” in her estate…

The big buzz about Aretha Franklin is the gold-plated casket, the Christian Louboutin patent leather shoes and the fact that she died without a will.

Aretha 2018The Queen of Soul’s four sons have filed a document that lists themselves as “interested parties” in her estate, according to an article from cbs.com titled “Report: Aretha Franklin left no will.”

A document that was said to have been filed with the Oakland County Probate Court in Michigan and signed by her son Kecalf and her estate attorney David Bennett noted the absence of a will.

"The decedent died intestate and after exercising reasonable diligence, I am unaware of any unrevoked testamentary instrument relating to property located in this state as defined" under the law, the document said, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Because she died intestate or without a will, Franklin's finances will become public. Her niece, Sabrina Owens, has asked Judge Jennifer Callaghan to be the personal representative of the estate.

Don Wilson, Aretha's entertainment lawyer, commented to the Detroit Free Press that he repeatedly suggested that she create a trust.

"I was after her for a number of years to do a trust," he said. "It would have expedited things and kept them out of probate and kept things private."

The attorney said he would’ve helped Aretha manage her holdings in music publishing and copyright issues for estate planning. Wilson added that at this point, it's impossible to estimate the value on her song catalog. However, he also said that she retained ownership of her original compositions.

In her home state of Michigan, the assets of a deceased person who was unmarried are divided equally among children. However, creditors or extended family members could contest the estate.

Aretha Franklin died at her home in Detroit after a long battle with cancer. Fans went to the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History for a public visitation, where they paid their respects, while her gospel music recordings were played.

Reference: CBS.com (August 22, 2018) “Report: Aretha Franklin left no will”

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