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What’s Happens to Digital Assets After You Pass Away?

We all have many more digital assets than we realize. What happens to those assets after you pass away?, asks Investment News in the article “4 ways to help clients control their digital afterlife.” The answer is not that simple. There are a large number of rules that survivors have to untangle, and many family members are stunned, when they find that not only don’t they have access to these accounts, but the data in the accounts may be deleted permanently, when they try unsuccessfully to log in too many times.

what happens to digital assets after you pass away
Keeping a list of all your user names and passwords with your estate planning documents is a big help.

Almost all states have passed the Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (RUFADAA), and experts are gaining a better understanding of how this law works and what happens to digital assets after you pass away.

Start by creating a complete inventory of all digital assets. Try using these categories:

  • Communication: email, contacts, login for phone
  • Rewards programs: hotels, airlines, restaurants
  • Shopping: eBay, Craig’s List, Amazon, department stores
  • Online storage sites: iCloud, data backup sites
  • Finances: online payments, banking, investment accounts, cryptocurrency
  • Social media: Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook, Snap Chat, WhatsApp
  • Gaming sites and fantasy leagues—especially if there is real money involved.

Make sure you include a list of all these digital asset with your other estate planning documents.

In a separate document (or in the will itself), you can list your wishes for each and every digital asset. Do you want your social media sites memorialized or do you want them shut down? Who gets your airline frequent flier miles? Who should have access to emails, taxes and social media sites? Where should pictures go?

It may be easier to use one of several available services that generate secure passwords for each site and store the passwords and usernames. Using provisions for denial of access until death, the named digital fiduciary should have the master password to that service, plus instructions for any two-factor authentication. Remember that your will becomes a public document upon your death, so don’t put any passwords in that document.

Reference: Investment News (Oct. 22, 2019) “4 ways to help clients control their digital afterlife”

Do I Need a Will?

Yahoo Finance’s recent article on this subject asks “Do You Really Need a Will?” As the article explains, without a will, you’ll be “intestate”—which means you’ll have no say in what happens to your assets and belongings once you pass away.

Do I need a will?
If you don’t have a will your assets will be distributed according to state law.

Many people ask the question, “Do I need a will?” Each state has its laws concerning the distribution of a person’s assets if they die without a will. These laws most likely won’t mesh with your personal wishes. If you don’t have a will, ask yourself why you don’t. Perhaps you think you don’t need one. However, more than likely you do. If you’re putting off starting this important estate planning task, here are some things to consider.

Just about everybody needs a will, but you definitely should have one if you’re married, you have minor children, you have real estate, or you have investments in the stock market. You should also have a will if you have possessions, such as cars, furniture, jewelry, paintings, and computers?

As far as your money and possessions, you probably have some thoughts as to who gets what. You may want to chip in on the education of some younger relatives or give specific pieces of jewelry to those who you know will appreciate them. If you have minor children, you probably have very definite ideas about who should be their guardians if you die.

With a will, you have control. Without a will, the state in which you live will distribute your assets according to its laws, regardless of your wishes.

After you pass away, there could be surprise money coming to you, and without a will, you have no control over where these funds go. Your estate could get some cash from returned security deposits, medical reimbursements, or refunds from utility companies. Furthermore, if you die in a car accident and there’s an insurance settlement, you have no say who gets those funds, which could be substantial.

You also need to think about your pets, and who would be the best person to care for your animals.

So, the answer to the question, “Do I need a will”, is almost certainly, yes.

Reference: Yahoo Finance (July 21, 2019) “Do You Really Need a Will?”

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