Asset Protection

Why Do I Need Estate Planning If I’m Not Rich?

Most people spend more time planning a vacation than they do thinking about who will inherit their assets after they pass away. Although estate planning isn’t the most enjoyable activity, without it, you don’t get to direct who gets the things you’ve worked so hard for after you pass away.

Estate Planning isn't only for the rich
An Estate Plan will protect your assets and your loved ones

Investopedia asks you to consider these four reasons why you should have an estate plan to avoid potentially devastating results for your heirs in its article “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important.”

Wealth Won’t Go to Unintended Beneficiaries. Estate planning may have been once considered something only rich people needed, but that’s changed. Everyone now needs to plan for when something happens to a family’s breadwinner(s). The primary part of estate planning is naming heirs for your assets and a guardian for your minor children. Without an estate plan, the courts will decide who will receive your property and raise your kids.

Protection for Families With Young Children. If you are the parent of small children, you need to have a will to ensure that your children are taken care of. You can designate their guardians, if both parents die before the children turn 18. Without a will with a guardianship clause, a judge will decide this important issue, and the results may not be what you would have wanted.

Avoid Taxes. Estate planning is also about protecting your loved ones from the IRS. Estate planning is transferring assets to your family, with an attempt to create the smallest tax burden for them as possible. A little estate planning can reduce much or even all of their federal and state estate taxes or state inheritance taxes. There are also ways to reduce the income tax that beneficiaries might have to pay. However, without an estate plan, the amount your heirs will owe the government could be substantial.

No Family Fighting (or Very Little). One sibling may believe he or she deserves more than another. This type of fighting happens all the time, and it can turn ugly and end up in court, pitting family members against each other. However, an estate plan enables you to choose who controls your finances and assets, if you’re unable to manage your own assets or after you die. It also will go a long way towards settling any family conflict and ensuring that your assets are handled in the way you wanted.

To protect your assets and your loved ones when you no longer can do it, you’ll need an estate plan. Without one, your family could see large tax burdens, and the courts could say how your assets are divided, or even who will care for your children.

Reference: Investopedia (May 25, 2018) “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important”

Theft Reported in Aretha Franklin’s Estate

Careful estate planning can prevent heirs from stealing assets from your estate. Aretha Franklin’s estate is a sad example.

Careful Estate Planning
Aretha Franklin’s estate woes highlight the need for careful estate planning.,

Detroit area police told the Free Press that an active theft investigation was ongoing, involving Aretha Franklin’s suburban mansion. However, the investigation began prior to her death.

The 76-year-old Queen of Soul passed away from pancreatic cancer in August in her Detroit riverfront apartment. When she died, she still owned her 4,100-square-foot Colonial-style home in Bloomfield Township, Michigan, which is in the sights of the IRS.

Wealth Advisor says in its article, “Police investigate theft from Aretha Franklin’s estate,” that the theft investigation was first reported by The Blast, a celebrity news website claiming Franklin’s estate is fighting with Franklin’s 61-year-old son, Edward, who was born when Aretha was only 14.

Her son Edward has been attempting to get a court order to force the estate to provide monthly financial documents to his mother’s heirs. However, the estate won’t turn over the information because it contends such information could negatively impact the criminal investigation involving stolen estate property.

Late last year, the IRS filed a claim in the County Probate Court, alleging that the Franklin estate owed millions in back taxes and penalties. An attorney for the estate stated that it had repaid more than $3 million in back taxes, since Franklin’s death. It’s believed that Franklin owed more than $6.3 million in back taxes from 2012 to 2018 and $1.5 million in penalties.

The Oakland County court documents did not state the exact value of her estate, which is believed to be in the tens of millions.

Immediately after her death, Franklin’s mansion, which is part of a gated community, was listed for sale at $800,000. However, it was then taken off the market. The custom-built home features six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, white marble floors and floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking two small ponds and a lap pool. The mansion also sports a sauna, a three-car garage and a jetted tub.

Franklin is said to have purchased the mansion for $1.2 million in 1997, according to The Detroit News. The home was built in 1990 and remodeled in 2002.

You can read more about asset protection on our website.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (January 11, 2019) “Police investigate theft from Aretha Franklin’s estate”

Here’s More Insight into Why Estate Planning is Critical

Fox 5 NY says in the article “Why estate planning is important regardless of your age or wealth” that this is great time to begin talking to your loved ones about estate planning, especially older relatives and parents.

The key to a successful discussion depends upon the right approach.

Try to always make suggestions, rather than demands. One great way to start the conversation with family members, is to mention what you’re doing. You might say something like, “I just took care of my own estate planning. Have you done anything? Maybe we should talk about it.” That might get the conversation rolling.

Many people believe that, as they get older, they need a will. However, that’s just one piece of the puzzle: core estate planning includes a will, power of attorney, health care surrogate and asset protection.

For most of us, the asset we most want to protect is our home. One of the best ways to do that is through a trust. Depending upon the type of trust you use, it may also have tax advantages, could protect your home during a healthcare crisis and protect your home from your children’s creditors.

You also need to find people you trust to help with finances and health care. A power of attorney is a legal document in which you grant a person the authority to handle finances on your behalf.

Similarly, a healthcare surrogate is an individual who makes healthcare decisions, if you get sick or are in an accident and can’t make decisions for yourself.

You can use one person to do both or separate individuals for each role. You can opt for a family member or a trusted friend. However, either way it should probably be a younger person, who won’t be dealing with the same aging issues as you.

You should also note that your will doesn’t cover everything. Make certain that any beneficiaries designated in your retirement plans or life insurance and any additional names on joint bank accounts are current. The beneficiaries you appointed by a designation form will get the money in those accounts, no matter what it says in your will.

If all of this sounds a bit complex, don’t worry because an experienced estate planning or elder law attorney can help you with all of the forms and all of your questions. Just understand these three things before you visit an elder law firm: your assets, whose names are on the accounts and your wishes.

Reference: Fox 5 NY (December 12, 2018) “Why estate planning is important regardless of your age or wealth”

Here’s Why You Need an Estate Plan

It’s always the right time to do your estate planning, but it’s most critical when you have beneficiaries who are minors or have special needs, says the Capital Press in the recent article, “Ag Finance: Why you need to do estate planning.”

While it’s likely that most adult children can work things out, even if it’s costly and time-consuming in probate, minor young children must have protections in place. Wills are frequently written, so the estate goes to the child when he reaches age 18. However, few teens can manage big property at that age. A trust can help, by directing that the property will be held for him by a trustee or executor until a set age, like 25 or 30.

Probate is the default process to administer an estate after someone’s death, when a will or other documents are presented in court and an executor is appointed to manage it. It also gives creditors a chance to present claims for money owed to them. Distribution of assets will occur only after all proper notices have been issued, and all outstanding bills have been paid.

Probate can be expensive. However, wise estate planning can help most families avoid this and ensure the transition of wealth and property in a smooth manner. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about establishing a trust. Individuals can name themselves as the beneficiaries during their lifetime, and instruct to whom it will pass after their death. A living trust can be amended or revoked at any time, if circumstances change.

With a trust, it makes it easier to avoid probate because nothing’s in an individual’s name, and the property can transition to the beneficiaries without having to go to court. Living trusts also help in the event of incapacity or a disease, like Alzheimer’s, to avoid conservatorship (guardianship of an adult who loses capacity). It can also help to decrease capital gains taxes, since the property transfers before their death.

If you have minor children, an attorney can help you with how to pass on your assets and protect your kids.

For more information about how to best protect your minor children, download a copy of Mastry Law’s FREE report, A Parent’s Guide to Protecting Your Children Through Estate Planning.

Reference: Capital Press (December 20, 2018) “Ag Finance: Why you need to do estate planning”

Is a Living Trust the Right Solution for Me?

Many families have chosen to establish a Living Trust as part of their overall estate plan.  However, according to a recent article from Forbes, “Why You Might Need To Fix Your Family Trusts”some families wind up becoming unhappy with their trusts because it’s the wrong solution for their situation.

There are several reasons why this happens. They include:

  • Poor Set-up. The trust wasn’t created properly, and the lawyer drafting the trust didn’t truly understand the wishes of the family;
  • Poor Writing. The language in the trust is inappropriate or too vague, which can cause issues; or
  • Poor Planning. The trust isn’t viable anymore because situations change, and the document wasn’t created in a way that allows it to adapt to a shifting environment.

The law is constantly changing. As a result, there are new legal strategies and structures that are better for some situations than a trust.  An experienced trust attorney should be consulted about all of the options for your situation.

For any family, there’s bound to be specific reasons why they need to fix their trusts.

Most problems, however, can be categorized in three areas:

  1. The trust doesn’t have provisions to provide necessary distributions to family members;
  2. The governance structure or rules of the trust may not provide for effective management or sufficient oversight; or
  3. The trust is tax inefficient.

When any of these situations occurs, there are ways to make sure the trusts work along with the needs and wants of the family. A trust that has any of these issues won’t be as effective as it could be. The trust should be fixed or replaced to achieve the family’s goals.

It’s wise to periodically review trusts to be certain that they’re satisfying the intended objectives and taking advantage of all of the possible benefits. A trust attorney may be able to make some adjustments that are significantly advantageous to the family.

If a family has questions about the efficacy of their trusts, they should review them with an experienced estate planning attorney. It’s important to examine the trust with a sound understanding of the needs, desires and preferences of the family.

Reference: Forbes (October 17, 2018) “Why You Might Need To Fix Your Family Trusts”

How Do I Make a Gift of Estate Planning to an Adult Child?

One thing driving Baby Boomers crazy is their kids’ estate planning–or lack thereof. Boomers have been building legacies from the day they were born.

As Forbes explains in its recent article “The Estate Planning Gift To Give Your Millennial Children In 2019,” Boomers entering their 60s and 70s are more focused than ever before on managing their family legacies. The 2018 U.S. Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth Study found that 67% of those over 50 want to use their wealth to invest in their children and grandchildren. Boomers who’ve managed their finances successfully, want to be sure their hard work doesn’t go to waste.

The challenge, however, is that Boomers can’t control all aspects of their financial lives. One complaint they have to their estate planning attorneys, is that their kids aren’t doing the things that they ask. Gen Xers and Millennials may see estate planning as a very low priority. Most are burdened by heavy debt and trying to get their day to day financial lives on the right track. Nagging parents might make them resist this type of advice.

There is one thing that Baby Boomers can do to make certain their children do the right thing, when it comes to estate planning—they can make a gift of estate planning to their adult children.

However, before Boomers do this, they should think about several issues to put their family on the path to success. Family dynamics can be challenging, and family patterns are often hard to break.

Parents who want to offer to pay for an adult child’s estate plan, should consider how best to broach the issue. A wrong start could torpedo the wrong situation and end in a family drama. Timing is crucial for these discussions. The assistance of your estate planning attorney can smooth the way for a successful approach. He can outline the process for everyone to feel that they have a voice. This can be done with a family meeting.

The advice for Boomers making this type of gift is quite simple: these conversations need to be more intentional in the why and the how. Boomers must also respect boundaries, once the estate plan is completed. They may have paid for the estate plan, but that does not mean they’re entitled to see the child’s documents. The burden of enforcing this parameter falls to the estate attorney.

The best gift a parent can give their children for 2019, is to help them organize and manage their affairs. If they offer to pay for an estate plan, Baby Boomers can take the right actions to be sure their legacies will continue after they are gone.

Reference: Forbes (December 12, 2018) “The Estate Planning Gift To Give Your Millennial Children In 2019”

What Does George H.W. Bush’s Estate Look Like?

For a guy who was often derided as living in a bubble of “old money,” George H.W. Bush didn’t accumulate a whole lot of cash. However, he really didn’t need to. The whole point of dynastic wealth is that it creates a seamless support system from cradle to grave, says Wealth Advisor’s recent article, “American Dynasty: What G.H.W. Bush Leaves Behind (And Who Steps Up To Inherit).”

Bush begins near zero on paper, sells his oil company and lets the interest accumulate. When his father dies, he doesn’t record more than a $1 million windfall. At that time, these were still impressive numbers, but it wasn’t exactly dynastic money. For a Bush of his era, it’s just money. The real non-negotiable asset is the Maine summer home. He paid $800,000 cash for it when he joined the Reagan White House and sold his Texas place to raise the money. However, his 1031 exchange switching houses backfired, because he still claimed Texas residency and so got no tax break on the capital gain.

Interestingly, the Kennebunkport house hasn’t been passed on through inheritance for generations and has never been put into a trust. The relative willing to take on the house would buy it from the previous owner’s estate, but it’s currently assessed at $13 million. Purchasing it would trigger roughly a $12 million capital gain today and wipe out the entire estate tax exemption for he and Barbara.

However, President Bush had world-class tax planning, and the family lawyer in Houston has been with him since the 1980s. The house isn’t in a trust yet, but it’s owned by a shell partnership that plays a similar function.

Bush owned the partnership, and now that both George and Barbara are gone,  the partnership might roll into a trust to distribute shares in the house to the children. If that’s the case, provided the kids see value in keeping the house, the trust pays the bills. Otherwise, they will sell it one day and distribute the proceeds.

Presidential memorabilia is very valuable. Most of the President’s collection went to his library. Otherwise, there might not be a lot of cash because George didn’t live very lavishly. His government pension probably was used for his everyday expenses. Any cash left in that trust, might well have accumulated for the beneficiaries. However, interestingly, much of the income was given to the kids years ago. This may have made a big difference establishing them in lives of business and philanthropy.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (December 3, 2018) “American Dynasty: What G.H.W. Bush Leaves Behind (And Who Steps Up To Inherit)”

Avoid These Three Big Estate Planning Mistakes

The Street lists the “3 Worst Estate Planning Mistakes and How to Avoid Them.” These are issues that frequently derail an estate plan:

Lack of Information. Unwinding the various pieces of your estate can be a monumental task. Some folks leave this all to chance. They fail to leave their personal representative and loved ones with a complete and updated list of where everything is located and how to get to it.

Think about all the assets you’ve accumulated in a lifetime: real property, brokerage accounts, bank accounts, mutual fund holdings, IRAs, pensions and others. They’re hopefully all protected by a host of user names and passwords and maybe even by the answers to questions, like your first pet’s name.

While things like insurance policies are likely online, some of your holdings are not available electronically. In addition, other possessions are totally digital, and you should guard against cyber-theft and hacking. Create a list of all your user names and passwords for investment accounts and other financial holdings.

Beneficiary Designations Issues. It’s not uncommon for people to forget that they’re required to name beneficiaries for their retirement accounts, annuity contracts and insurance policies. Messing this up is a guarantee that your assets will wind up in probate. It can be an expensive and time-consuming legal process, where your wishes may be disregarded.

Outdated Plans. Sometimes, decades pass after estate documents are signed and put away. In the meantime, divorces and other life events happen, radically impacting the original estate planning objectives. In addition, changes in tax laws might impact your initial intentions. It’s smart to periodically review what is in your will and your beneficiary designations.

Reference: The Street (November 29, 2018) “3 Worst Estate Planning Mistakes and How to Avoid Them”

Where Do I Start as an Executor if There’s a House in the Estate?

Handling an estate can be a monumental task. The Greater Baton Rouge Business Report explains the details in its article that asks “So you inherited a house … now what?

For instance, an executor’s immediate worry might be the safety of the house. One of the first questions an heir might ask, is whether there’s a security company involved that has a contract for monitoring. If so, contact the company to see where to call should there be a security breach and change the security passwords. Another suggestion is to change the locks on the house, because who knows who has been given keys to the home over the years. Siblings might want to place valuable items in safety deposit boxes or remove them from the house, as soon as they can.

The key to this entire process among heirs is communication. Keep everyone up-to-date. This alone will reduce the risk of misunderstanding, mistrust and frustration in the family.

Different interests among siblings often creates tensions after inheriting a house. A house may have sentimental value to the heirs, but the executor must stay objective about the situation. Reducing the house to cash by selling it and dividing the proceeds, typically makes the most financial sense.

It’s costly to maintain a house in an estate and insurance and court proceedings can also be expensive. Come to an up-front agreement on terms of the sale, when drafting an estate plan, because disagreements among siblings can sometimes lead to costly and lengthy court proceedings.

Heirs might decide to keep a house, especially if it’s a beach house or mountain retreat. You’ll then need someone to be the manager. One way to accomplish this is to establish a limited liability company (an LLC) with the other heirs. This gives the heirs a more stable, corporate management structure, while allowing for more flexibility. Place a year’s worth of cash to cover of expenses into the LLC and sign an agreement between heirs that states what happens with repairs, renting the property and other scenarios.

If you do sell, the sooner you sell it and the closer to the time of death, the less likely you’ll have to pay taxes on any appreciation since the time of death and have to worry about what the value was at the date of death. Inherited assets get a new tax basis, known as the date-of-death value. Use a qualified real estate appraiser to value the property, because the beneficiaries need to know the house’s most recent value to calculate capital gains tax later, should they choose to sell it.

Reference: Greater Baton Rouge Business Report (November 13, 2018) “So you inherited a house … now what? Here’s some advice

Can Beneficiary Designations Help Simplify the Estate Planning Process?

Often overlooked, the beneficiary designation can be one of the easiest ways to move assets directly to heirs without going through the probate process.

Many accounts and financial products will allow you to designate a beneficiary.  The beneficiary is the person who will receive the asset directly when the owner passes away. This is something that most of us encounter when we open a bank account, purchase an insurance policy or start a retirement savings plan, according to the article, “A simple way to simplify estate planning,” appearing in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal.

MP900442211The type of assets that allow beneficiary designations also include annuities, transfer-on-death investment accounts, pay-on-death bank accounts, stock options and executive deferred compensation plans.

Remembering who the beneficiary is on these accounts can be difficult. However, when you consider the consequences of having the incorrect person named on the asset, it’s well worth the effort. Due to the importance of the beneficiary designation, note these reminders:

  • Designate beneficiaries. Without this, assets can be tied up in probate court, resulting in delays, costs and unfavorable tax treatment.
  • List a primary and contingent beneficiary. It is common to have a spouse as primary beneficiary, and a child as contingent, which lets the asset pass to the child if the spouse has also passed away. You can also name a charity you support to be the contingent.
  • Keep things up-to-date. Any time there’s a birth, adoption, death, marriage or divorce, you should review your accounts and polices.
  • Go through the instructions on the form before signing it. Beneficiary forms can vary, so review each one.
  • Coordinate your beneficiary designations with your will or trust documents. If they don’t, it could cause the probate process to be delayed.
  • Work with an estate planning attorney before naming a trust as a beneficiary. Tax consequences may be different for a trust than for an individual, so some situations make a trust a wise option.
  • Know the tax consequences of naming a beneficiary of a particular asset. That’s because every asset does not have the same tax treatment.

Far too many people learn the hard way, that whatever is on the beneficiary designation determines who receives the asset, no matter what is in your will. Make a list of all of assets that have a beneficiary designation and review it when you review your estate plan. If you don’t have a contingency beneficiary, add that as well. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help you if you run into any questions and to ensure that your beneficiary designations align with your overall estate planning goals.

Reference: Tupelo Daily Journal (November 2, 2018) “A simple way to simplify estate planning”

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