Estate Tax

Should I Designate a Trust as Beneficiary of my IRA?

There are many pros and cons to naming a trust, rather than an individual as a beneficiary of the IRA. However, there are some complex rules. You need to get it right, because this may be your biggest asset.

Name a Trust as Beneficiary of my IRA
Naming a trust as beneficiary of your IRA has many benefits.

Investment News’ recent article on this subject asks “Should you name a trust as an IRA beneficiary?” The article explains that individual retirement account assets can’t be put into trusts directly during a person’s lifetime, without destroying the IRA’s tax shelter. Therefore, a trust may only be named as the beneficiary of the IRA. The trust would inherit the IRA upon the owner’s death, and beneficiaries of that trust would have access to the funds.

Asset protection is one rationale for making this move, because some trusts shield IRA assets from lawsuits, business failures, divorce and creditors. Taxpayers enjoy state and federal protections for IRA assets during their lifetime. However, heirs who inherit an IRA directly—not through a trust—don’t receive those protections, unless provided by state law. Trusts also allow for some control over the assets. The terms of a trust can stipulate the way in which distributions are made if an heir is a minor, disabled, financially unreliable, incapacitated or vulnerable.

Naming a trust as an IRA beneficiary may not be practical for people who plan to bequeath their IRA to a spouse, rather than their children, grandchildren or others. Spouses are allowed roll over the decedent’s IRA assets into their own IRA tax-free.

There are some technical rules to follow, like the IRA beneficiary form must indicate before a person’s death, that the trust is the primary beneficiary. After death, the IRA must be retitled as an inherited IRA. Required minimum distributions (RMDs) would still also be required for the IRA. This is an area where using the right type of trust is important. A “see-through” or “look-through” trust may be the best bet.

Structuring a trust this way maintains the IRA’s preferential tax treatment. That allows a trust beneficiary to spread the RMDs over a long period based on his life expectancy. This is called a “stretch IRA.” The RMD amount would be based on the oldest beneficiary of the trust. However, beneficiaries with separate trust shares would have different RMDs.

In addition, the trust’s language must also state that distributions from the IRA can only go to “designated beneficiaries,” not to pay expenses. The risk of not creating the trust as a see-through or including this language, is that the IRA assets are distributed and the resulting tax paid within a much shorter time frame—potentially five years.

Trusts may also be set up as “conduit” or “discretionary” trusts. With a conduit trust, the annual RMDs pass through the trust to beneficiaries, who pay tax at their individual rates. Discretionary trusts don’t distribute the RMDs out of the trust and they pay tax at the more punitive trust tax rates. However, they keep the most post-death control over assets.

Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about these trusts and how they can work with your IRA.

Reference: Investment News (February 22, 2019) “Should you name a trust as an IRA beneficiary?”

How Do I Include Charitable Giving in My Estate Plan?

One approach frequently employed to give to charity, is to donate at the time of your death. Including charitable giving into an estate plan, is great way to support a favorite charity.

Baltimore Voice’s recent article, “Estate planning and charitable giving,” notes that there are several ways to incorporate charitable giving into an estate plan.

Charitable Giving
Incorporating charitable giving in your estate plan is one of the most common ways to give to charity.

Dictate giving in your will. When looking into charitable giving and estate planning, many people may start to feel intimidated by estate taxes, thinking that their family members won’t get as much of their money as they hoped. However, including a charitable contribution in your estate plan will decrease estate tax liabilities, which will help to maximize the final value of the estate for your family. Talk to an experienced estate attorney to be certain that your donations are set out correctly in your will.

Donate your retirement account. Another way to leverage your estate plan, is to designate the charity of your choice as the beneficiary of your retirement account. Note that charities are exempt from both income and estate taxes. In choosing this option, you guarantee that your favorite charity will receive 100% of the account’s value, when it’s liquidated.

A charitable trust. Charitable trusts are another way to give back through estate planning. There is what is known as a split-interest trust that lets you donate assets to a charity but retain some of the benefits of holding the assets. A split-interest trust funds a trust in the charity’s name. The person who opens one, receives a tax deduction when money is transferred into the trust. However, the donors still control the assets in the trust, and it’s passed onto the charity at the time of their death. There are several options for charitable trusts, so speak to a qualified estate planning attorney to help you choose the best one for you.

Charitable giving is a component of many estate plans. Talk to your attorney about your options and select the one that’s most beneficial to you, your family and the charities you want to support.

Reference: Baltimore Voice (January 27, 2019) “Estate planning and charitable giving”

Why Do I Need Estate Planning If I’m Not Rich?

Most people spend more time planning a vacation than they do thinking about who will inherit their assets after they pass away. Although estate planning isn’t the most enjoyable activity, without it, you don’t get to direct who gets the things you’ve worked so hard for after you pass away.

Estate Planning isn't only for the rich
An Estate Plan will protect your assets and your loved ones

Investopedia asks you to consider these four reasons why you should have an estate plan to avoid potentially devastating results for your heirs in its article “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important.”

Wealth Won’t Go to Unintended Beneficiaries. Estate planning may have been once considered something only rich people needed, but that’s changed. Everyone now needs to plan for when something happens to a family’s breadwinner(s). The primary part of estate planning is naming heirs for your assets and a guardian for your minor children. Without an estate plan, the courts will decide who will receive your property and raise your kids.

Protection for Families With Young Children. If you are the parent of small children, you need to have a will to ensure that your children are taken care of. You can designate their guardians, if both parents die before the children turn 18. Without a will with a guardianship clause, a judge will decide this important issue, and the results may not be what you would have wanted.

Avoid Taxes. Estate planning is also about protecting your loved ones from the IRS. Estate planning is transferring assets to your family, with an attempt to create the smallest tax burden for them as possible. A little estate planning can reduce much or even all of their federal and state estate taxes or state inheritance taxes. There are also ways to reduce the income tax that beneficiaries might have to pay. However, without an estate plan, the amount your heirs will owe the government could be substantial.

No Family Fighting (or Very Little). One sibling may believe he or she deserves more than another. This type of fighting happens all the time, and it can turn ugly and end up in court, pitting family members against each other. However, an estate plan enables you to choose who controls your finances and assets, if you’re unable to manage your own assets or after you die. It also will go a long way towards settling any family conflict and ensuring that your assets are handled in the way you wanted.

To protect your assets and your loved ones when you no longer can do it, you’ll need an estate plan. Without one, your family could see large tax burdens, and the courts could say how your assets are divided, or even who will care for your children.

Reference: Investopedia (May 25, 2018) “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important”

Theft Reported in Aretha Franklin’s Estate

Careful estate planning can prevent heirs from stealing assets from your estate. Aretha Franklin’s estate is a sad example.

Careful Estate Planning
Aretha Franklin’s estate woes highlight the need for careful estate planning.,

Detroit area police told the Free Press that an active theft investigation was ongoing, involving Aretha Franklin’s suburban mansion. However, the investigation began prior to her death.

The 76-year-old Queen of Soul passed away from pancreatic cancer in August in her Detroit riverfront apartment. When she died, she still owned her 4,100-square-foot Colonial-style home in Bloomfield Township, Michigan, which is in the sights of the IRS.

Wealth Advisor says in its article, “Police investigate theft from Aretha Franklin’s estate,” that the theft investigation was first reported by The Blast, a celebrity news website claiming Franklin’s estate is fighting with Franklin’s 61-year-old son, Edward, who was born when Aretha was only 14.

Her son Edward has been attempting to get a court order to force the estate to provide monthly financial documents to his mother’s heirs. However, the estate won’t turn over the information because it contends such information could negatively impact the criminal investigation involving stolen estate property.

Late last year, the IRS filed a claim in the County Probate Court, alleging that the Franklin estate owed millions in back taxes and penalties. An attorney for the estate stated that it had repaid more than $3 million in back taxes, since Franklin’s death. It’s believed that Franklin owed more than $6.3 million in back taxes from 2012 to 2018 and $1.5 million in penalties.

The Oakland County court documents did not state the exact value of her estate, which is believed to be in the tens of millions.

Immediately after her death, Franklin’s mansion, which is part of a gated community, was listed for sale at $800,000. However, it was then taken off the market. The custom-built home features six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, white marble floors and floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking two small ponds and a lap pool. The mansion also sports a sauna, a three-car garage and a jetted tub.

Franklin is said to have purchased the mansion for $1.2 million in 1997, according to The Detroit News. The home was built in 1990 and remodeled in 2002.

You can read more about asset protection on our website.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (January 11, 2019) “Police investigate theft from Aretha Franklin’s estate”

How Do I Calculate Estate Taxes?

Handling the affairs of a loved one’s estate can be stressful and difficult. However, to receive the full benefit of the gift a loved one leaves you, it’s critical to be prepared for the taxes that gift may incur. This is the advice in Investopedia’s article, “Estate Taxes: How to Calculate Them.” The article explains the potential tax liability, upon transfer of an estate after death.

The high rate of the federal estate tax (40%) motivates most people to calculate their potential estate tax beforehand. It’s a good idea to figure the amount you might owe in estate tax before something happens, instead of leaving your family to deal with the consequences afterwards.

Estate tax is calculated on the federal and state level. Florida does not have an estate tax, however, there are now still several states that have their own estate tax: Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.

The federal estate tax starts when the fair market value of your assets hits $11.18 million per individual. Each state that has an estate tax has its own minimum on when the estate tax kicks in, ranging from $675,000 to $1 million. As a result, you can be eligible to pay the state estate tax, the federal, or both. Because the estate tax is determined based on the current market value of your assets instead of what you paid for them, calculating that number can be more complex.

There’s no need to include any property you intend to leave your spouse or an eligible charitable organization. Initially, you’ll need to calculate the value of the gross estate. Debt, administrative fees, and assets that will be left to charities or a surviving spouse will then be deducted from the total market value of those assets.

Next, add any gifts, including gifts that fall above the gift tax exemption. The $11.18 million exemption includes gifts (it’s a way of keeping people from giving away their fortune before their death to avoid estate taxes).

If the loss of a loved one is imminent, preparing for the tax burden of estate transference ahead of time, can make the grieving process a little easier and can be a comforting distraction.

You can also prepare for taxes on your own estate to lessen the burden of the friends and family you leave behind. If you have questions, speak to an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Investopedia “Estate Taxes: How to Calculate Them”

Why Do I Need an Estate Plan?

Investopedia’s recent article, “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important,” says you should think about the following four reasons you should have an estate plan. According to the article, doing so can help avoid potentially devastating consequences for your family.

  1. An Estate Plan Keeps Your Assets from Going to Unintended Beneficiaries. A primary part of estate planning is choosing heirs for your assets. Without an estate plan, a judge will decide who gets your assets. This process can take years and can get heated. There’s no guarantee the judge will automatically rule that the surviving spouse gets everything.
  2. An Estate Plan Protects Your Young Children. If you are the parent of minor children, you need to name their guardians, in the event that both parents die before the children turn 18. Without including this in your will, the courts will make this decision.
  3. An Estate Plan Eliminates a Large Tax Burden for Your Heirs. Estate planning means protecting your loved ones—that also entails providing them with protection from the IRS. Your estate plan should transfer assets to your heirs and create the smallest tax burden as possible for them. Without a plan, the amount your heirs may owe the government could be substantial.
  4. An Estate Plan Reduces Family Headaches After You’ve Passed. There are plenty of horror stories about how the family starts fighting after the death of a loved one. You can avoid this. One way is to carefully choose who controls your finances and assets, if you become mentally incapacitated or after you die. This goes a long way towards eliminating family strife and making certain that your assets are handled in the way you want.

If you want to protect your assets and your loved ones after you’re gone, you need an estate plan. Without one, your heirs could face large tax burdens and the courts could decide how your assets are divided or even who will care for your children.

Reference: Investopedia (May 25, 2018) “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important”

Can I Give Real Estate to a Charity in my Estate Plan?

Many nonprofits are now encouraging donors to make gifts of non-liquid assets, like cars, boats or real estate. If its thoroughly vetted and properly structured, a gift of real estate can help donors meet their financial planning and philanthropic goals, and at the same time give charities a new source of funding.

Real estate holdings account for a major part of the assets in U.S. households. However, just a small proportion of charitable contributions are land or buildings. Many individuals with real estate holdings may want to consider donating their property to charity, instead of selling the property themselves. That’s particularly true, if they want to minimize taxes or generate retirement income.

The fact that many real estate gifts are more complex and cost more for charities to process and manage than cash donations, means that it’s important to think about donating to charitable organizations that have developed a clear set of gift acceptance policies and have the necessary procedures in place to accept a gift of real estate. As a prospective donor, you should look for policy guidelines that detail the kinds of properties that will and won’t be accepted. Perhaps the charity only accepts commercial or undeveloped land.

It is also important to look for the types of estate planning tools donors are allowed to use when making these gifts. These tools can include charitable remainder trusts, charitable gift annuities and retained life estates. You should also see if there are any stipulations on the charity’s acceptance of properties that come with mortgages or other risk factors.

Once a real estate gift has been approved on a preliminary basis by a charity, the donor may then be required to provide additional information about the property. This “due diligence” phase may include a title search, assessments of the local market and environmental conditions, a professional inspection and a site visit by the organization’s representative. It is customary for the charitable organization to defray the costs of conducting these studies.

After the due diligence has been finished, and the charity has agreed to accept the gift, the donor will be notified of the results of the investigations, and of the plans for how the final transfer of the property will take place.

This type of donation can offer many advantages to donors, including generating income, deferring or lowering taxes and decreasing the expenses of property maintenance.

Be sure to consult your estate planning attorney to discuss real estate contributions to charities.

Reference: TC Palm (November 8, 2018) “Donation of real estate is nice form of charitable giving”

How Do I Set Up a Trust?

Trust funds are often associated with the very rich, who want to pass on their wealth to future heirs. However, there are many good reasons to set up a trust, even if you aren’t super rich. You should also understand that creating a trust isn’t easy.

U.S. News & World Report’s recent article, “Setting Up a Trust Fund,” explains that a trust fund refers to a fund made up of assets, like stocks, cash, real estate, mutual bonds, collectibles, or even a business, that are distributed after a death. The person setting up a trust fund is called the grantor or settlor, and the person, people or organization(s) receiving the assets are known as the beneficiaries. The person the grantor names to ensure that his or her wishes are carried out is the trustee.

While this may sound a lot like drawing up a will, they’re two very different legal vehicles.

Trust funds have several benefits. With a trust fund, you can establish rules on how beneficiaries spend the money and assets allocated through provisions. For example, a trust can be created to guarantee that your money will only be used for a specific purpose, like for college or starting a business. And a trust can reduce estate and gift taxes and keep assets safe.

A trust fund can also be set up for minor children to distribute assets to over time, such as when they reach ages 25, 35 and 40. A special needs trust can be used for children with special needs to protect their eligibility for government benefits.

At the outset, you need to determine the purpose of the trust because there are many types of trusts. To choose the best option, talk to an experienced estate planning attorney, who will understand the steps you’ll need to take, like registering the trust with the IRS, transferring assets to the trust fund and ensuring that all paperwork is correct. Trust law varies according to state, so that’s another reason to engage a local legal expert.

Next, you’ll need to name a trustee. Choose someone who’s reliable and level-headed. You can also go with a bank or trust company to be your trust fund’s trustee, but they may charge around 1% of the trust’s assets a year to manage the funds. If you go with a family member or friend, also choose a successor in case something happens to your first choice.

It’s not uncommon for people to have a trust written and then forget to add their assets to the fund. If that happens, the estate may still have to go through probate.

Another common issue is giving the trustee too many rules. General guidelines for use of trust assets is usually a better approach than setting out too many detailed rules.

Reference: U.S. News & World Report (November 8, 2018) “Setting Up a Trust Fund”

What If I Don’t Want to Give My Kids My Assets?

Just because Warren Buffet wants billionaires to sign his giving pledge, doesn’t mean you have to.  However, not everyone wants to leave everything to their kids.

There are many reasons why some parents simply don’t want to give all, or a large portion of their assets to their children. Type “A” personality parents who made every sacrifice to grow their wealth, may be disappointed with kids who aren’t at all motivated. A family may also be fragmented by politics, or disappointed in their children’s selection of partners.

25204256865_58d1892fa3_oAmerica is about to see a massive transfer of wealth from baby boomers, who’ve stockpiled an estimated $30 trillion. The “Me Generation” will probably spend some of its fortune, but there’ll be a lot remaining to pass along to their heirs. Research shows that between 2031 and 2045, as much as 10% of U.S. wealth could change hands every five years.

Think Advisor’s recent article, “Who Leaves an Inheritance, Who Doesn't,” says that some people are more inclined to leave an inheritance than others. The reasons for doing so aren’t all intuitive.

In an effort to better understand what influences an individual’s intention to leave an inheritance, researchers at Kansas State University analyzed data from the 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances. The survey is given every three years by the Federal Reserve. It gathers data about U.S. household balance sheets, income, expenditures, key demographics and attitudes. After controlling for net worth, household income and other demographic characteristics, KSU used a binary logistic regression model to parse out the variables associated with the expectation of leaving an inheritance.

The results revealed the traits that are closely linked to leaving an inheritance and those that aren’t. They found that children aren’t a significant predictor of whether a person is likely to leave an inheritance. Likewise, owning cash-value life insurance or being a habitual saver doesn’t seem to play a role in an individual’s bequest rationale.

The top predictor most associated with passing on wealth is an individual’s own expectation of receiving an inheritance. The survey found that people who expected to receive an inheritance were nearly 16% more likely to leave money to their heirs. However, those who actually did receive an inheritance, were 7% more likely to want to do the same for their own family.

It is not a shock, but a second leading predictor is a person’s attitudes about leaving an inheritance to others. Those respondents who ranked this goal as important, are 9.5% more likely to expect to leave an inheritance, as opposed to those who said it wasn’t important.

One interesting note: people who own businesses place a high value on inheritances. Perhaps the same drive that fuels the acquisition of wealth to attain a luxurious retirement, also pushes individuals to want to provide for their families.

In the end, what families leave to their children is just as much about values, family lore and a sense of belonging, as the asset left for children and the grandchildren.

An estate planning attorney can help you create a plan that addresses the assets you’d like to leave for the family members, charitable giving, a plan to manage estate taxes and a means to pass along more intangible and meaningful assets, like values and principles.

Reference: Think Advisor (October 19, 2018) “Who Leaves an Inheritance, Who Doesn't”

Expect to Keep Working? You Still Need a Succession Plan

If you’re a business owner who loves what you do, you consider your business to be one of your biggest achievements after your family and enjoy the challenges it presents. As for retiring, why should you?

Some business owners are reluctant to even consider selling the business or retiring. They don’t make a succession plan, says The San Antonio Business Journal in the article, “Plan your exit even if you never plan to leave your business,” and that can lead to a disaster for their family and their employees. That’s something the business owner needs to consider—and why even if they plan on working, until they are carried out, they need a succession plan.

Bigstock-Couple-running-bookshop-13904324Decrease your taxes. Whether you ultimately decide to sell your business, transfer ownership or die working, you probably don't want to pay more taxes than you have to. There are two ways exit planning can help minimize taxes, even if you truly want to work until you die. If your business value increases, your estate can benefit from a step-up in basis, if your ownership transfers pursuant to your estate plan. This saves your estate or beneficiaries from paying duplicate taxes on the entire business value.

The lifetime exclusion for gift and estate taxes is now to the point where most small and mid-sized business owners don’t need to pay estate taxes, if owners have created an appropriate estate plan. Your exit plan lets you leverage these benefits, since estate planning is a vital component in proper exit planning.

Protect your values. If you created a work culture that’s so unique and strong that it helps your company stand out in the marketplace or your business gives back to the community through charity work, exit planning lets you pursue and preserve your progress toward those objectives. Exit planning strategies can foster the culture you’ve built, protect the employees who made the business a success, and help you build the legacy you want. Exit planning can help keep your chosen values front and center and protect its value, even without your presence.

Growing your business. Everyone wants their business to grow in value, but many business owners get to a point where they can’t grow the company any more, by simply doing the same things they’ve been doing. However, exit planning concentrates on building business value, whether you exit or not. These activities can help you increase your business’ growth potential, by emphasizing value drivers. Those are the aspects of your business that make it attractive to buyers. When it’s done the right way, installing value drivers can make your ownership even more fulfilling—concentrating on certain value drivers can let you focus on only your favorite tasks within the business and delegate your least favorite responsibilities to other qualified employees.

You may keep working until the very end, or you may encounter a life event that makes you rethink how much of your time you want to devote to the business. Either way, a succession plan is like an estate plan for your business. It protects your family at home and your work family. Both will appreciate you doing so.

Speak with an estate planning attorney who can help you with your personal and business plans for the future.

Reference: The San Antonio Business Journal (October 16, 2018) “Plan your exit even if you never plan to leave your business”

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